Noticias

JSCA Validates Methodologies for Studies of Civil Justice Systems in Germany and Spain

Lüneburg and Madrid, June 2016

JSCA Training Coordinator Leonel González and Research and Projects Coordinator Marco Fandiño visited the cities of Lüneburg and Madrid in order to hold validation workshops of the methodologies of the civil justice system studies of Germany and Spain that JSCA is conducting in the context of the project “Improving Access to Civil Justice in Latin America” with the support of Global Affairs Canada, GAC.

JSCA Training Coordinator Leonel González and Research and Projects Coordinator Marco Fandiño visited the cities of Lüneburg and Madrid in order to hold validation workshops of the methodologies of the civil justice system studies of Germany and Spain that JSCA is conducting in the context of the project “Improving Access to Civil Justice in Latin America” with the support of Global Affairs Canada, GAC.

As part of this project, which will last for the next five years, two comparative studies will be conducted that can serve as references to support civil justice reform processes in Latin America. The experiences chosen for the studies are those of Germany and Spain.

The case study of the German system is being led by German Professor Norbert Losing. The Spanish case study is being conducted by Professor José Alberto Revilla of Universidad Autónoma de Madrid.

In addition to the validation workshops, the JSCA coordinators used the opportunity to observe oral civil hearings in the municipal courts of Lüneburg and criminal justice hearings in the regional courts of the German city. They also met with civil judges and administrative personnel from the municipal court of Lüneburg.

In Spain, they visited the first instance civil courts, where they observed hearings and met with judges, judicial secretaries and court officials in addition to observing criminal hearings in the Audiencia Provincial de Madrid.

In order to gather information on the current operation of the Spanish civil justice system, González and Fandiño took part in two workshops. The first was held for a group of judges and judicial secretaries and the other was with a group of attorneys and attorneys general. Both workshops were held at the headquarters of the Madrid Bar Association.

The final activity was a working lunch with officials from Universidad Autónoma de Madrid in the context of the cooperation agreement between the school and the international agency, which will allow students from its Master’s degree program on Governance and Human Rights to work as pro bono interns at JSCA’s headquarters in Santiago de Chile.