Noticias

Brazilian Justice Operators take part in Training Program on Adversarial Criminal Justice System

Over 40 justice system operators from 11 Brazilian states took part in the training program “Tools for the Implementation of an Adversarial System in Brazil.” The course, which was held in Santiago de Chile, was organized by JSCA with the Brazilian Institute for Procedural Law, IBRASPP; the Bahian Institute for Criminal Procedure Law, IBDPP; and the Brazilian Institute of Criminal Sciences, IBCCRIM. The objective of the program was the review the regional experience in this area, particularly the Chilean process, which will allow the participants to learn about the implementation of an adversarial criminal justice system.

 Over 40 justice system operators from 11 Brazilian states took part in the training program “Tools for the Implementation of an Adversarial System in Brazil.” The course, which was held in Santiago de Chile, was organized by JSCA with the Brazilian Institute for Procedural Law, IBRASPP; the Bahian Institute for Criminal Procedure Law, IBDPP; and the Brazilian Institute of Criminal Sciences, IBCCRIM. The objective of the program was the review the regional experience in this area, particularly the Chilean process, which will allow the participants to learn about the implementation of an adversarial criminal justice system.

Brazil’s criminal procedure code has been in place since 1941, making it one of the oldest in the region. A commission of the Brazilian National Congress is currently considering a bill in this area. As such, attorneys, prosecutors, public defenders and academics from 11 of Brazil’s 26 states, some of them members of IBRASPP, IBDPP and IBCCRIM, took part in the initiative in Santiago.

The training program, which ran from June 28 through July 1, combined expository modules that addressed key topics related to the introduction of an adversarial system, group work to analyze information and simulate hearings, and visits to a regional prosecutor’s office and courts in Chile’s adversarial criminal justice system so that participants could observe arraignment and oral trial hearings.

The topics addressed were:

  • General overview of criminal justice reform in Latin America: The experience of the criminal procedure reform in Chile and the situation of Brazil’s criminal justice system;
  • The function of the public prosecutor’s office in an adversarial system;
  • The experience of regional prosecutor’s offices in Santiago de Chile;
  • Structure of a criminal procedure using hearings;
  • Organization of the defense and the role of the public defender;
  • The importance of training in a reformed system; and
  • The organization of the courts and judicial management. 

The faculty was composed of JSCA’s Executive Director, Jaime Arellano; JSCA’s Training Coordinator, Leonel González; the Executive Director of the Metropolitan North Regional Prosecutor’s Office, Paz Pérez; JSCA Research and Projects Coordinator Marco Fandiño; Chile’s National Public Defender, Andrés Mahnke; and Santiago Guarantee Judge Eduardo Gallardo. The Brazilian presenters were prosecutor Fauzi Hassan Choukr, Professor Jacinto Coutinho and the President of the Board of IBRASPP, Nereu Giacomolli.