Noticias

JSCA Organizes First Latin American Meeting on Criminal Analysis and Smart Prosecution in Buenos Aires

The inauguration of the First Latin American Meeting on Criminal Analysis and Smart Prosecution was held in Buenos Aires on June 10. The event, which was attended by the National Attorney General of Argentina, Alejandra Gils Carbó, was organized by JSCA, the Institute for Comparative Studies in the Criminal and Social Sciences (INECIP) and the Public Prosecutor’s Office.


In addition to the Attorney General, the inauguration of the two-day event featured the participation of the President of the Federal Criminal Policy Council, Pablo López Viñals; the President of INECIP, Alberto Binder; and JSCA Training Coordinator Leonel González.

The inauguration of the First Latin American Meeting on Criminal Analysis and Smart Prosecution was held in Buenos Aires on June 10. The event, which was attended by the National Attorney General of Argentina, Alejandra Gils Carbó, was organized by JSCA, the Institute for Comparative Studies in the Criminal and Social Sciences (INECIP) and the Public Prosecutor’s Office.

In addition to the Attorney General, the inauguration of the two-day event featured the participation of the President of the Federal Criminal Policy Council, Pablo López Viñals; the President of INECIP, Alberto Binder; and JSCA Training Coordinator Leonel González.

The purpose of the meeting, which was attended by representatives of nine countries in the region, was to reflect on the current challenges of the prosecution service, how the prosecutor’s office should organize its criminal prosecution policy and which tools it should use. The evidence suggests that while prosecution services have to a great extent adopted their role in the criminal justice process and restructured their inner workings in order to increase their effectiveness, they continue to suffer from a lack of a strategic vision regarding which crimes to focus on and which segment they seek to impact. These factors would allow them to strategically allocate human, budgetary and material resources. 

The meeting included the presentation of key experiences in the development of criminal analysis in the region. Participants then discussed the current situation and challenges that prosecution services face in this area. The event was attended by representatives of a few Argentine provinces, Chile, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Peru and Honduras.


“Organized crime must be investigated and prosecuted through planning, strategy, training and the unified effort of every government agency,” Gils Carbó remarked at the opening session.

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Binder added that criminal phenomena have become more complex, which makes it difficult to be a prosecutor and especially chief prosecutor. “The old intuitions of the past about how to do the work, the idea that dedication and honesty alone were sufficient, have fallen very short.”

López Viñas said that there is a need to further develop relationships between provincial and federal prosecution agencies. “Working separately has cost us a great deal and we are turning a new page,” he said.

González noted that the meeting is taking place in the context of a transition from a semi-inquisitorial system to an adversarial one, “moving away from the ‘case by case’ approach that means seeing each event as part of a conflict.”

The program continued with the panel “Criminal Prosecution and Criminal Analysis Needs,” which featured presentations by the Director of the Criminal Analysis and Criminal Prosecution Planning Unit (DAC) of the Federal Prosecution Service (MPF) of Argentina, Diego García Yomha; the Director of Analysis of Fundación Paz Ciudadana of Chile, Patricio Tudela; the Director of the National Criminal Analysis Unit of the prosecutor’s office of Chile, Claudio Ramírez; and the Directors of the DAC of the Dominican Republic, Wilson Camacho, and Guatemala, Aura Colindres.

The next panel was “Strategic Management of Criminal Prosecution.” It included presentations by Lisandro Pellegrini of the Institutional Coordination Secretariat in the MPF Argentina; Chief Prosecutor of the Financial and Complex Crimes Unit at the Santa Fe MPA, Sebastián Narvaja; the Undersecretary of Criminal Policy of the Ministry and Justice and Human Rights, Martín Casares, Damián Neustatd, of the Cybercrime Specialized Prosecution Unit at MPF Argentina; and Marco Fandiño, JSCA’s Research and Projects Coordinator.

The first day ended with the panel “The Problem of Shared Use of Criminal Information.” It included the Attorney General of Chubut, Jorge Luis Miquelarena; the Secretary of the Intelligence Area of the Santa Fe Ministry of Security, Eduardo Estévez; Gustavo González, of the Secretariat of Criminal Policy of the Santa Fe Public Prosecutor’s Office; the Manager of the MPF Criminality Observatory of Peru, Juan Huambachano Carbajal; and JSCA Training Area Coordinator Leonel González.

On the second day of the meeting, a closed workshop was held with experts and invited guests that focused on analyzing Criteria and Experiences for the Creation of Criminal Analysis Units in Latin America. The participants shared the experiences of criminal analysis units from participating countries, analyzing the entities to which they belong, who coordinates them and the models used to generate a Criminal Analysis Network for Latin America.

The final panel was “Criminal Analysis of Drug Trafficking and Money Laundering: National and International Cooperation Networks.” The panel included Marcelo Farías, Director of the Technical Drug Trafficking Department of the Argentine Federal Police Criminal Analysis Department; Omar Povolo, Director of the Human Trafficking Division of the Argentine Federal Police; Diego Iglesias, Director of the Drug Crimes Attorney General’s Office; Francisco Eccehomo Forero, Assistant Director of CTI Medellín in the Colombian Prosecutor’s Office; and Diego Solernó, General Directorate of Regional and International Cooperation of Argentina’s MPF.